Maggie & Amos foundation release statement following murder arrest

BYRON (WREX) — The foundation named in honor of a Byron mother and son killed in 2016 has released a statement following the arrest of Maggie Rosko’s ex-husband on murder charges.

The Maggie & Amos Foundation wrote on Facebook, “On October 19th, 2016, Maggie and Amos were cruelly taken away from us. These past three years have been spent working through our stages of grief, waiting and praying that resolution would come. We are grateful to our local law enforcement for the many hours of time spent thoroughly investigating the events that occurred that night. We continue to look to our local states attorney and judicial department to ensure that justice is served appropriately and with fidelity for Maggie and Amos. And as always, we at The Maggie & Amos Foundation promise to our community that we will continue to diligently serve you with our original intent… that the message of Maggie and Amos’s story will not be one of an unspeakable act, but one of unconditional love and goodwill to others.”

The 31-year-year Maggie and her 3-year-old son Amos were found dead on the morning of Oct. 19, 2016 at their home on Silverthorn Drive in Byron. The home was on fire, and was later determined to be set by arson.

On Thursday, nearly 3 years to the day of their murders, the Ogle County Sheriff’s Office announced Duane Meyer, Maggie’s ex-husband, had been charged in their deaths and was in custody at the Ogle County Jail.

In 2016, Meyer told officials he was at the home to pick up their son, when he discovered the house was on fire.

“This moment is bittersweet. For while justice may be served and questions may now be answered, we are still left with the sadness of knowing that they are no longer with us,” the foundation wrote.  

The foundation posted Thursday that it appreciates the support that the community has provided to set up the nonprofit foundation.

“It is rewarding to see so many people gather together to celebrate and remember that our years Infinity Event; an event named for the saying that Maggie and Amos used to say to each other…’I love you Infinity!'” The foundation continued by saying, “We now that Maggie and Amos would have loved to be a part of creating something so special that draws people together.”

The post focused on the good Maggie and Amos brought to those around them, calling Maggie a “fun-loving, laugh-seeking, sass-backing, one-of-a-kind gal” whose greatest accomplishment in life was Amos.

Statement by Maggie & Amos Foundation

We have been asked if we had a statement to share our thoughts on the recent arrest of the subject charged in the murders of Maggie and Amos. This has been a long awaited moment for family and friends who have endured almost three years of heartache and loss following their deaths. This moment is bittersweet. For while justice may be served and questions may now be answered, we are still left with the sadness of knowing that they are no longer with us.

When we first established The Maggie & Amos Foundation, we emphasized that we wanted Maggie & Amos to be remembered for how they lived their lives and not for how they died. We vowed that we would continue their legacy of kindness and giving to others in their names. We continue to aspire to hold true to this. So for our statement, we would like to share with you a few things about Maggie and Amos that compels us to work so hard to keep their memories alive.

Maggie was a fun-loving, laugh-seeking, sass-backing, one-of-a-kind gal. She was fierce in her love for her family, friends, and child. A mamma bear if there ever was one. She was a special education teacher who used her wit and creativity to her advantage. She was known for challenging her students (and coworkers) to outrageous bets. She could race barefooted down the hallway the fastest, chug a lunch sized carton of milk in less than 5 seconds, and stand on dozens of raw eggs without breaking one (Well, she did eventually accomplish that once. Her first many attempts were fails full of yolk and shell). She once convinced her two fellow educators to sleep in a tent on the school grounds during a torrential rain storm because her students met their reading goals. She was a mix of soft hearted and hard headed, which was a perfect compliment to the children that she taught. They never knew when they entered her classroom if she would be singing them country ballads, dancing around like Buddy the Elf (her favorite movie played on repeat at Christmas, and at any other time of the year), or dressed in an outrageous costume. She could always be counted on for a genuine smile, a meaningful high 5 with a, “You can do it!” in the voice from The Waterboy, or a gentle shoulder to cry on.

She whole-heartedly cheered on the Bears and White Sox, and jeered on the Packers and Cubs. She never felt bad about wearing head to toe White Sox apparel and carrying a broom around with her after her team swept the Cubs in a three game series. She celebrated her Irish heritage year round, and especially throughout March. She believed green was not meant for small doses when St. Patrick’s Day was near. She was ferociously afraid of spiders and truly believed the best spider was a dead spider. Her friends at work were familiar with her shrieks to know to come to her aid immediately when a spider dared cross her path.

Her proudest accomplishment in life was her beautiful little boy, Amos. Her favorite word was, “Momma.”

Amos was all boy who inherited his mother’s goofy, yet thoughtful nature. He lived to be outside, digging in the dirt, creating paths and hills for his tractors to plow over. He was an animal lover, with a special place in his heart for “moo-cows,” “<snort> pigs,” and “woofs.” Amos had a talent for naming his dear pets. “Nose” for his fish and “Fire Truck” for his rabbit. When asked why he chose those names, his response was, “Cuz that’s their names!” He was perfecting the art of the 3-year-old eye roll. He was excited to start preschool and learn how to write his own name. He enjoyed playing hide and seek, but he needed to work on his hiding game. He didn’t quite realize that just hiding his face didn’t make him invisible to others. He celebrated his third birthday with a Paw Patrol party where he got his very first bicycle. He was determined to soon be riding next to his triathlon-contending mom. His happiest moments were with his mom by his side, off on an adventure, exploring new places.

We have greatly appreciated the tremendous support that our community has provided in our efforts to establish our nonprofit foundation in the names of Maggie and Amos. It is rewarding to see so many people gather together to celebrate and remember at our yearly Infinity Event; an event named for the saying that Maggie and Amos used to say to each other… “I love you Infinity!” We know that Maggie and Amos would have loved to be a part of creating something so special that draws people together.

On October 19th, 2016, Maggie and Amos were cruelly taken away from us. These past three years have been spent working through our stages of grief, waiting and praying that resolution would come. We are grateful to our local law enforcement for the many hours of time spent thoroughly investigating the events that occurred that night. We continue to look to our local states attorney and judicial department to ensure that justice is served appropriately and with fidelity for Maggie and Amos. And as always, we at The Maggie & Amos Foundation promise to our community that we will continue to diligently serve you with our original intent… that the message of Maggie and Amos’s story will not be one of an unspeakable act, but one of unconditional love and goodwill to others.

To see the Facebook post, CLICK HERE. 

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